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For this MIT couple, cancer research is the family business

Organic chemistry classes can create all sorts of memories, but few as lasting and meaningful as those of Alfred Singer ’68 and Dinah (Schiffer) Singer ’69. Since meeting while taking 5.41 in 1965—and graduating from MIT with degrees in biology (Dinah) and philosophy with a minor in biology (Al)—they have built an enduring marriage andContinue reading “For this MIT couple, cancer research is the family business”

The power of simple innovations

A labyrinth of rooms stretches across the third floor of N51, the weathered gray building that has long housed the MIT Museum. The rooms look more like a handyperson’s workshop than a scientist’s lab. There’s woodworking equipment, metalworking equipment, hammers, wrenches, and dozens of boxes just for storing bike parts. Cookstoves line a windowsill. PotsContinue reading “The power of simple innovations”

Looking to space to cure osteoarthritis

In 1976, Alan Grodzinsky ’71, ScD ’74, was feeling a little frustrated.  He had spent two years teaching a basic course on semiconductor physics and circuits in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, learning the material in the fast-moving field as he went along. That didn’t leave him any time for research. ThenContinue reading “Looking to space to cure osteoarthritis”

The way forward: Merging IT and operations

Reihaneh Irani-Famili knows a little about the fault line running through just about every business today: the IT/OT divide. Now vice president of emergency planning and business resiliency at gas and electricity company National Grid, Irani-Famili was in previous jobs a translator of sorts between information technology, which manages data and applications, and operational technology,Continue reading “The way forward: Merging IT and operations”

As the Texas power crisis shows, our infrastructure is vulnerable to extreme weather https://t.co/rcxi5gvk38

As the Texas power crisis shows, our infrastructure is vulnerable to extreme weather https://t.co/rcxi5gvk38 — Lenore Albert (@LenoreAlbert19) Oct 26, 2021 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js from Twitter https://twitter.com/LenoreAlbert19 October 26, 2021 at 11:15AM via IFTTT

Investing in people is key to successful transformation https://t.co/6o4NuHNx6H

Investing in people is key to successful transformation https://t.co/6o4NuHNx6H — Lenore Albert (@LenoreAlbert19) Oct 26, 2021 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js from Twitter https://twitter.com/LenoreAlbert19 October 26, 2021 at 10:14AM via IFTTT

Investing in people is key to successful transformation

People can be your most important catalyst for digital transformation—or the greatest obstacle. When people-related challenges to transformation progress emerge, the problems are usually very easy to identify but much harder to solve. The challenge is not awareness. Organizations realize that cloud transformations are hard and that they need highly skilled, motivated staff to carryContinue reading “Investing in people is key to successful transformation”